Chuck Kranz Hired as Technology Support Technician II at Washburn Tech

I am happy to report that Chuck Kranz has been hired as a Technology Support Technician II at Washburn Tech.  Chuck worked as a Technology Support Technician I in Morgan Hall for the past few years.  Chuck will work at the Washburn Tech campus Monday – Friday from 7:30 am – 4:30 pm providing support for IT needs at the Washburn Tech campus.  His primary contact number is 785-670-3000 which goes to our support line so that we can provide additional assistance for the Washburn Tech campus by providing additional technicians to be able to assist with issues.

Please join me in welcoming Chuck to the Technology Support Technician II role and providing full-time support for the Washburn Tech campus.

Email Tips – Creating a Contact Group

  1. On the Navigation bar, click People.
  2. People
  3. Under My Contacts (on the left), pick where you want to add the contact group.
  4. Click Home > New Contact Group.
  5. On the Contact Group window, in the Name box, type a name for the group.
  6. Click Add Members.
    Add Members
  7. Find and double-click each member until they are all listed in the Members box
    Members
  8. Click OK
  9. Click Save and Close.

 

Email Tips – Junk Email

There is a new junk email (also known as spam) filter with Office 365. You will find all your filtered mail in a folder called “Junk Email”.

The following steps are how you can help Outlook 2013 learn which messages should not be marked as junk:

  1. Select the Junk Email folder
  2. Look through the messages
  3. If you find a message that shouldn’t be junk
    1. Select the message
    2. On the Home tab, click Junk
    3. Select Not Junk
      2014-02-12_14h10_38
    4. If you want to always receive email from the sender, click OK
    5. If you don’t always want to receive email from the sender, uncheck “Always trust…” and click OK
    6. Repeat

The following steps are how you can help Outlook Web App learn which messages should not be marked as junk:

  1. Select the Junk Email folder
  2. Look through the messages
  3. If you find a message that shouldn’t be junk
    1. Select the message
    2. Click in the upper right of the message
    3. Select mark as not junk
      2014-02-12_16h28_39
    4. Repeat

Office 365 Spam Filtering and E-Mail Routing Changes

ITS has removed e-mail routing through the old Washburn mail system.  E-mails to @washburn.edu addresses are now being delivered directly to Microsoft Office 365.

For the most part, this change will not be noticeable to you.  Key changes:

  • E-mail spam filtering is no longer being done via the Barracuda Spam firewalls
  • E-mails will no longer arrive with [SPAM] or [POSSIBLE SPAM] headers
  • You will no longer receive e-mail quarantine reports (with a possible exception of a last one for today)
  • Spam filtering is being perform by Microsoft Office 365 anti-spam systems and suspected spam is delivered to your “Junk Email” folder

Let us know if you have any questions.  We’re preparing additional guidance on managing your spam settings and will publish that shortly.  Microsoft documentation on spam management in Office 365 can be found at this link:

http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/office365-suite-help/spam-and-virus-protection-in-office-365-small-business-HA103582250.aspx

Questions or problems, please contact ITS User Services at support@washburn.edu or by calling 785-670-3000.

 

Vote for Washburn University Virtual Tour and Campus Map

The eduStyle Higher-ed Web Awards celebrate the best work in college and  university websites.  This year Washburn University’s www.washburn.edu website is a finalist in the Best Campus Map or Virtual Tour category.  Vote for Washburn University Virtual Tour and Campus Map by September 2nd at:

http://www.edustyle.net/awards/2013/nominees.php?message=vote

virtual tour

Winners will be announced by Sept. 9th.

(You must register to vote)

Improvisation…

On a recent trip to St Louis, my wife and I listened to Tina Fay talk about her life.  We were listening to her audio book Bossypants.  It was all very entertaining, but I found her stories on “improv” very interesting… and I thought I would share what I learned.  I know it sounds a little odd… why would I share little gems about improvisation on this blog?  One answer is that stories from every walk of life can help us reflect and provide insight into our own situations.  My wife’s answer is that I think too much… and that might be just as valid.  You can use your own judgement.

Regardless, I took away the following advice when you are asked to do improvisation.

  1. Commit.  Seems simple enough.  You can’t go into improv half way.
  2. Agree.  If someone tells you an apple is really a banana and you say “no it isn’t”, then you’ve just killed the conversation.  This is a partnership in which each party must agree with the other in order to be successful.  No matter where the story goes, you have to go along.
  3. Add value.  If you are told the apple is a banana and you simply reply with a question like “where did you get it?”, you are placing the burden back on your partner to continue the conversation.  On the other hand, if you say “that banana is radioactive”, you’ve added to the story. 
  4. Don’t limit yourself.  After all, this is improv, anything is possible.

OK, so why did I find this relevent to my work with technology?  Because the use of technology is a partnership and its too easy to disagree and kill the conversation.  Its much more rewarding if you can agree with the desired application and add value.  Try to guide the conversation to a successful end.  And don’t limit yourself to existing models and practices, there may be options not yet on the table.  Participate, be positive and be flexible.

Obviously, life is not improv.  We have limitations to what we can do… and we have to ask a lot of questions to understand desired outcomes and applications.  But we can add value and have some fun along the way. :)

Maybe my wife is right…