By Shelby Fehrenbacher
Major at Washburn : Psychology
Hometown: Topeka, Kansas
The Casa Materna logo, a baby held up in front of the sun with two doves flying above.

The Casa Materna logo, at the entrance to the center.

This morning we packed up our belongings since we will be leaving the Quaker House and will not return until the closing of our trip, We prepared for a few hour trip into the city of Matagalpa where we will see the Casa Materna most specifically but also be able to explore the mountain city.

Entering Matagalpa was in many ways a different experience than coming into Managua or Masaya. This city bustled with business men, vendors, children playing, and cars whistling in and out, just as the other cities. Yet, it felt different. I could feel more chaos but not necessarily in a negative way. Managua, in comparison to Matagalpa, was like Topeka to Kansas City. Matagalpa rang with passion, with hope, and with excitement.

Our first stop was to eat lunch at a buffet style restaurant within the city. Everyone was eager to get into the city and quickly gather after eating in order to get going. It was misting a bit as we walked down the road but we laughed about how rain wouldn’t stop us from experiencing this portion of Nicaragua.
We came across the center square where everyone was bustling about and the chapel stood front and center. Outside the chapel was much like chapels we see in the United States. Once we entered inside the chapel, however, it came alive unlike any chapel I’ve ever seen. The white walls, floors, and ceiling pieces glistened and made the whole place seem angelic. We learned that in Latin America saints and other holy figures are a bigger deal than many places in the states and this was really evident in the chapel.
I also took a side trip with a peer to the staircases of Matagalpa. These stairs were built into the sloped hills of the city and overlooked the city. It took a little energy to climb them and I kept wondering how the people who had houses up there were able to go up and down every day. At the top of the stairs, we looked down and watched over the city like birds contemplating flight. And I was. I searched within myself wondering where to go from here. It’s funny how adventures like this can change you. Being one with nature and myself, I began pondering my next step. Nicaragua is starting to find its way into my journey like quicksand molding into my toes; It’s channeling a new path inside of me and I’m excited to see where it leads.
The main event of the day was our orientation to Casa Materna. Here, we got to sit with the women and nurses of the house and speak with them about what they do. The women that were patients at the center were a bit soft-spoken at the meeting and though we yearned to hear their stories, it was evident that many of them did not feel comfortable sharing. The nurses gave us a lot of information about what Casa Maternna does and we learned of the distance the women had to travel to get to the casa and the nearest hospital from their homes. One woman had to travel 5 hours by bus, get on another bus for a few hours, and then travel another few hours by foot. One of the most important aspects of the Casa Materna is its ability to reduce the mother and infant morbidity and mortality rates and spread the concept of this late-term care to other municipalities.
I kept thinking back to the time I was pregnant and had a new nurse come into my midwife appointment and ask a million questions regarding how my pregnancy was going and how I felt about it. I remember wanting to tell her I felt miserably sick, was in pain all the time, really had to use the restroom, would much rather be sleeping, and many other not so happy parts of the pregnancy process. I remembered watching TV and how the women were all sunshine and roses saying how much they loved being pregnant and how joyous it was to introduce the baby to this world. And i remember thinking how unrealistic that was.
Sitting next to the women receiving care at Casa Materna and seeing them in all their not-so-glorious pregnancies but also hearing of all that the Casa had to offer them to help make the most of this beautiful yet hard time for them made me come to a few important conclusions. First, that we take so much for granted in our pregnancies in the U.S. For those in Nicaragua, conveniently placed hospitals, someone catering to needs, and the ability to have special rules or privileges during pregnancy are prescribed and suggested but not automatic. Second, that as the U.S. undergoes this struggle to create a place for more natural home-births, the women of Nicaragua are devastated by the challenges that come with births at home for them. And lastly, that despite the small differences, in many ways we are all really the same. Just as many women in the U.S. feel defeated, ashamed and unnerved at many points within their pregnancies so do the women of Nicaragua. But most importantly, many of the women in the U.S. feel hope, faith, and love throughout their pregnancies and thanks to the Casa Materna, the women of Nicaragua can rest easier and feel hope, faith, and love, too. It’s amazing how hope can blossom when you’re not consumed by worry.
NOTE: We visited Casa Materna last year as well. Read more about that visit. This visit was on Wednesday. Today, Friday, we head for El Limon and our family stays. We’ll be in touch again on Monday night.

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